Friday, August 07, 2015

          Professor Short To Co-Edit Peer-Reviewed Journal, Regulation & Governance

          Professor Short, who has been writing on regulation for the last decade, calls the journal “an important voice in an increasingly important field.”

          Jodi Short

          Regulation & Governance publishes articles that seek to make sense of the dizzying array of rules facing individuals and businesses in a globalized world, including laws enacted by national legislatures, regulations promulgated by government regulators, international obligations decreed by intergovernmental organizations, guidelines issued by private standard-setting and certification bodies, and norms enforced by non-governmental advocacy organizations and local communities. These rules cover every imaginable topic, from financial regulation, to environmental protection, to human rights in global supply chains.

          Founded in 2007 as an outlet for research on the development, implementation, enforcement and consequences of regulatory rules, Regulation & Governance has published articles on subjects ranging from the challenges of implementing environmental transparency policies in developing countries, to how financial industry groups have influenced post-financial crisis regulatory reform, to the factors that promote compliance with labor standards by global supply chain factories. It is among the most cited academic journals in law, political science and public administration. Professor Short, who has been writing on regulation for the last decade, calls the journal “an important voice in an increasingly important field.”

          Professor Short became interested in the field while working on compliance as a young attorney. “I found it astonishing — the amount of front-line responsibility that I had as a new lawyer for advising clients on how to comply with regulation. I was very curious to explore that from an academic perspective when I went back to graduate school.”

          She has since gone on to research whether or not companies exceed environmental standards and their incentives to do so. Most recently, her work has focused on suppliers’ compliance with codes of conduct prescribing health, safety and international human rights standards in global supply chains. Although these codes of conduct are not legally binding, Short found that “one of the major factors promoting [a supplier’s] compliance with these private sets of rules is whether or not they’re located in a country with robust public systems of governance, like strong domestic labor regulation or participation in international labor treaty regimes.” Short said that she considers her new role at the journal an exciting opportunity to shape the direction of the field and honor for herself and for UC Hastings: “It is an acknowledgment not only of my scholarly contributions, but also a recognition of the deep well of regulatory expertise we have here on the faculty of UC Hastings.”

          Short hopes that the journal will provide valuable professional and educational opportunities for UC Hastings students as well. Students can become involved in the editorial process by helping to screen articles, identify peer-reviewers in the authors’ fields to provide feedback on article submissions, synthesize reviewer comments, and manage relationships between the reviewers and writers. “The work would give students valuable exposure to cutting-edge issues in transnational regulation as well as improving their analytical, writing, and business communication skills,” she said.

          Students can get an extra dose of regulatory studies this fall by enrolling in Professor Short’s new class, Compliance and Risk Management for Attorneys. The course is designed to prepare students for a law practice that will inevitably be saturated with regulation from a wide variety of sources. “I want to teach them that being a lawyer is about more than putting on a suit and standing up and arguing in front of judges—it’s about understanding how to help clients comply with the complex web of regulatory obligations they face so that they can stay out of court,” Short said.

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