Tuesday, September 22, 2015

          Professor Mattei’s New Book Applies Ecological Thinking to the Law

          With co-author Fritjof Capra, Mattei and fellow scholars will discuss how a systemic revision of the law can benefit humanity and the planet.
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          Today’s legal system is based on an obsolete world view, says Professor Ugo Mattei in his new groundbreaking book, Ecology of Law: Toward a Legal System in Tune with Nature and Community, published this fall by Berrett-Koehler Publishers and distributed by McGraw-Hill Europe.

          Our global capitalist economic system and its protective legal regime has all but devastated the natural environment and created widespread inequality with drastic repercussions for all but the richest nations. With Fritjof Capra, a bestselling author, physicist, and systems theorist, Mattei outlines how integrating  the principles of ecology could create a legal system that benefits the environment and the poor.

          A paradigm shift in science, moving from a mechanistic understanding of the universe to one based on fluid, dynamic interactive systems, has had little impact on the law. Our current legal framework approaches the world as a collection of distinct parts protected by the state for individuals who “own” them. Yet this has led to an abandonment of the common good, with corporations polluting the environment, extracting irreplaceable natural resources, and exploiting the labor of powerless individual, all for the endless production of stuff, most of which is ultimately wasted.  

          The Ecology of Law brings a new understanding of how legal structures could become more systems oriented, thereby reconfiguring how we value our natural resources and profoundly reconceptualizing how humanity can pursue justice for all.

          The two authors will discuss the book with Professor Anna di Robilant of Boston University Law School, History Professor Mark Mancall of Stanford University, and Professor Talha Sayed of UC Berkeley Law on Wednesday, October 7th at 3.30 pm in the Sky Room, 100 McAllister Street, 24th Floor. Refreshments will be served.

          To read the introduction of the book, which has been enthusiastically endorsed by Naomi Klein, Vandana Shiva, Ralph Nader and Yanis Varoufakis, please click here.  To pre-order the book, please click here.  Copies will also be available for sale at the event.

          Please click here to register.

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