Monday, September 21, 2015

          Washington Center for Equitable Growth Funds WorkLife Law Center’s Stable Schedules Study

          The research study tests profitability and benefits of scheduling practices for hourly retail workers in Gap stores. 

          Sample alt tag.

          The Washington Center for Equitable Growth has awarded Professor Joan Williams’ Center for WorkLife Law a second $40,000 grant for the 2015-2016 fiscal year.

          The Washington Center for Equitable Growth is a new research and grant-making organization that works to build bridges between academics and policymakers focused on economic inequality.

          The grant, along with grants from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the Suzanne M. Nora Johnson & David G. Johnson Foundation, supports a pilot to be launched in roughly 30 Gap stores in the San Francisco and Chicago areas. “Our goal is test out best practices to make hourly workers’ schedules more predictable and stable,” said Sarah Adler-Milstein, the project manager for the study. The Pilot also will test whether shifting hourly workers to more stable, predictable schedules, and providing them with new opportunities for additional hours, results in cost savings and increased productivity for Gap.

          In the first year of work in 2014-2015 -- also partially funded by a Washington Center for Equitable Growth grant -- Professor Williams and her team piloted and improved upon a set of schedule-stabilizing practices at three Gap stores. Professor Susan Lambert at the University of Chicago is co-Principal Investigator of the study; she brings her deep expertise on scheduling issues faced by hourly workers.

          Gap decided to implement enterprise-wide two new schedules practices tested out in the three Gap stores that participated in the preliminary pilot: the elimination of on-call shifts (where workers do not learn whether they will need to work a scheduled shift until two hours before the shift begins) and two weeks advance notice of schedule.

          The study beginning this fall will test out stable scheduling practices in 15 Bay Area stores and 15 Chicago stores. Managers who volunteer will be randomly assigned to implement a suite of stable scheduling conventions that go beyond what currently exists. “These are a set of interventions designed to allow people to have better work life balance,” said Adler-Milstein. Over the next nine months, the results from the control stores will be compared with the experimental stores. 

          Their priority is to examine how stable scheduling impacts both business outcomes and quality of life for employees; the researchers will also collect qualitative data from managers and they will survey workers extensively before and after the new practices are put into place. “Will these new policies impact the workers’ family lives, or their ability to set up childcare? Will new schedules reduce stress and allow them to be healthier, or allow them the schedule predictability needed to read to their kids or volunteer?” Adler-Milstein asked.

          The recent elimination of on-call shifts by other retailers like Starbucks, Abercrombie & Fitch, Victoria’s Secret, Wal-Mart, and Williams Sonoma seem to indicate that erratic worker schedules are increasingly seen by businesses as negative for the bottom line and for worker well-being. The Center for Worklife Law’s Stable Schedules for Hourly Workers Study will ideally back up this growing perception and pave the way for increased business profitability and increased stability for hourly workers.  

          Go to News Archive

          Share this Story

          Share via Facebook
          Share via TwitterShare via EmailPrint Friendly Version

          Other Recent Stories/ RSS

          Friday, February 16, 2018

          Patrick Barry '94 Takes COO Role at Legal Tech Startup Logikcull

          The cloud-based eDiscovery software company brings Barry back to business as a tech executive after a two-year sabbatical.
          Thursday, February 01, 2018

          Thinkers & Doers: January 2018

          Inaugural Exhibition of the McEvoy Foundation for the Arts – Professor Viswanathan co-authors SSRN’s "Top Paper of 2017" – When Deportation is a Death Sentence – A project to “restate” copyright law – Alum named 2018 Antitrust Lawyer of the Year – Posh Hotels & Swanky Cocktails in the Tenderloin – Calling out racists actually good for health – Bay Area Corporate Counsel Winners – and much more
          Monday, January 29, 2018

          Justice Lidia Stiglich '95 Brings Compassion to the Bench

          She is taking a “people-centric” approach as the first openly gay justice to serve on the Nevada Supreme Court.
          Thursday, January 18, 2018

          1L Cindy Muro Receives Scholarship for Domestic Violence Advocacy

          A survivor of abuse herself, Muro now strives to do everything in her power to help people help themselves and create a platform for individuals to be heard.
          Thursday, January 11, 2018

          Message from Dean Faigman: On the passing of Professor Geoff Hazard

          “A deeply inspiring teacher, a mentor to many generations of students and faculty, an enormously influential scholar, and a dear friend to so many of us.”
          Go to News Archive